Students with Disabilities

As you begin your academic experience at George Mason University, you may want to speak with someone about your major and potential careers you may be interested in. We have teams of trained counselors and advisors to support you.  

Career Counseling Team

Our team of trained career counselors can help you find out which majors best fit your strengths, interests, and skills. They'll also share expert advice on how to explore career options in your field of study or help you find college courses that will prepare you for internships.  

Industry Advising Team

Industry advisors will help you prepare for an internship or job by sharing industry-specific knowledge. They can help answer questions about how to prepare for your career of choice, create a resume, search and apply for internships and jobs, or how to negotiate a salary offer. 

To meet one of our counselors or industry advisors, schedule your appointment in Handshake or call us at 703-993-2370.  

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Job & Internship Search

Job & Internship Search

Finding a job or internship is an important aspect of your college experience. There are two main resources you should be aware of at George Mason University: 

  1. Handshake is Mason’s platform for accessing jobs and internships. In addition, Handshake provides access to employer and Career Services events and connections to both Mason and students at other universities. 

  1. The Workforce Recruitment Program (WRP) is operated by the United States Department of Labor and is designed to connect federal and private sector employers with individuals with disabilities who are looking to highlight their skills in an internship or full-time position. This program is open to current students, both on the undergraduate and graduate level, as well as those who have graduated within the last two years. 

Note: WRP opens each fall at Mason and is administered by the Office of Disability Services (ODS). Students will need to register with ODS to participate in the Workforce Recruitment Program. 

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When applying for a job

When applying for a job

Review the job posting and make sure you have the qualifications for it.  

  • Employers are required to detail the essential functions of the job to ensure that qualified people with disabilities are not discriminated against.  

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Preparing for the Interview

Preparing for the Interview

Some questions employers may ask include:

  • If you are applying for a federal government position or for a job with a federal government contractor, they will ask you if you want to self-identify as a person with a disability under Sections 501 and 503 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.
  • An employer is allowed to ask medical questions about your ability to complete job functions if these questions are asked of all employees, regardless of disability.
Under the ADA, employers are not allowed to ask you questions about your disability before you are employed with them. However, an employer who may not be familiar with your disability may ask for more information about it before setting up accommodations. If they do, it is your responsibility to provide accurate information so that the employer can arrange the accommodation.
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Accommodations 

Accommodations 

While an employer is not required to provide the exact accommodation requested, they must provide a suitable, reasonable accommodation.

  • Consider all the accommodations you may need for the interview such as a sign language interpreter, someone to assist with completing paperwork, or that the interview is held somewhere with wheelchair accessibility.

  • Ask about tests that you may need to take during the interview process, which may alert you to accommodations you will need.

For example, if you are blind and request that an interview test be read to you, the employer may choose to offer the test on a computer using a screen reader or by audio recording instead as long as it allows you to complete the task.

Use the Searchable Online Accommodation Resource (SOAR) database to find examples of different types of appropriate accommodations.

Understanding Disclosure

When you transition from college to the world of work, you can choose to disclose your disability. Generally, individuals with disabilities consider whether their disability affects their job performance before making a decision to disclose it.

Download this chart to help you understand how, when, why, and to whom to disclose.